Cirrus Gallery and Cirrus Editions Ltd.

Cirrus @Fifty: Fred Eversley, Barbara T. Smith, Judy Chicago, and Math Bass

Cirrus @Fifty: Fred Eversley, Barbara T. Smith, Judy Chicago, and Math Bass

Fred Eversley, Barbara T. Smith, Judy Chicago, and Math Bass

For fifty years, Cirrus Editions and Gallery has published work by a diverse selection of California artists. Early projects pushed the boundaries of printmaking and then-accepted art forms—Ed Ruscha’s “Pepto-Caviar Hollywood” (1970) was printed with Pepto Bismol and caviar, and Baldessari’s print “Fallen Easel” (1988) incorporated found photographic source material.

This exhibition features a range of source material, from lens-based photographs to the glass plate optics of an flatbed scanner, and the binary code of digital manipulation. From Fred Eversley’s prints of parabolic lenses to Barbara T. Smith’s flatbed biological or mineralogical scans, Judy Chicago’s smoke-filled performance, and Math Bass’s suggestive, flat digital environments, the artists included all engage with the photographic—optical or binary. “Cirrus @Fifty” celebrates printmaking’s reproductivity—its engagement with and without the mark, as technology extends the ongoing meaning of what is available to art.

Image Credit:

Judy Chicago On Fire at Eighty (detail), 2019

Energy flux is the common denominator of all natural and human systems….The genesis of energy is central to the mystery of our existence as animate beings in an inanimate universe.

Fred Eversley refers to the presence of the energy of light—of the sun—in his work

Fred Eversley

Rigel

2019

24 x 24 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

727c-FE19

$1,800

d41be8_c75c672c481a49a68ee896f7837565b3~mv2.jpg

Fred Eversley

Sirius

2019

24 x 24 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

728c-FE19

$1,800

d41be8_97c1b6a3af8b4f088b5795be39829400~mv2.jpg

Barbara T. Smith, experimenting with “Rocks, Weeds, Dirt,” in 2019

Fred Eversley

Vega

2019

24 x 24 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

729c-FE19

$1,800

d41be8_e256f0d7aa6140f885147a1c9f6b4d44~mv2.jpg

Judy Chicago

On Fire at Eighty

2019

24 x 30 1/8 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 50

731c-JC19

$4,200

d41be8_c59e736babca4e76b3727485c5e687ed~mv2.jpg

Barbara T. Smith, “Field Piece” installation, Cirrus, 1971

Math Bass

Newz!

2019

36 1/8 x 33 1/8 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

732c-MPB19

$2,500

d41be8_743e4da34a484576956260fa5eb664e5~mv2.jpg

Math Bass

Newz!

2018

36 1/8 x 33 1/8 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

726c-MPB18

$2,500

d41be8_8b8534bf656a4139a9868deb10c959f3~mv2.jpg

Judy Chicago, Lloyd Hamrol, and Eric Orr, “Dry Ice Environment no. 1,” 1967, performance at a parking lot in Century City, Los Angeles, CA

d41be8_e8d8d65f476f4ed7a15745bb8ead5185~mv2.jpg

Newz!

Math Bass

2017

36 1/8 x 33 1/8 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 40

711c-MPB17

$2,500

Barbara T. Smith

Rocks, Weeds, Dirt

2019

18 1/2 x 38 1/2 in.

Archival Pigment print

ed. 50

$1,800

d41be8_d65ae3ac2d7d4e839f991eb270ded313~mv2.jpg

d41be8_cc6199efbb374334b868c3b6cf1429bd~mv2.jpg

Barbara T. Smith

Signifier 2

2016

41 5/8 x 30 1/2 in.

Archival pigment print

ed. 35

704c-BS16

$2,500

Fred Eversley
Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky and one of Earth’s nearest neighbors. Blue supergiant Rigel, and blue-white Vega are the brightest stars in their respective constellations—Orion and Lyra. These works articulate the artist's longstanding interest in the concentration of solar energy in parabolic form, for the first time in print. A NASA engineer who left the field to practice art in 1967, Eversley constructed centrifuges and casting equipment from used aerospace components, spinning these giant multi-hued fish-eye lenses from colored acrylic. Eversley was recognized in a solo show at the Whitney Museum in 1970. He was included in “Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power,” at Tate Modern, the Brooklyn Museum, and Crystal Bridges, and his work is collected by MOMA, NY, LACMA, the Whitney Museum, and the Guggenheim.

Barbara T. Smith
Barbara T. Smith installed her iconic “Field Piece” at Cirrus in 1971—one hundred eighty “blades of grass” molded from translucent fiberglass. Smith is a foundational figure in West Coast performance art. She was born in 1931 in Pasadena, did undergraduate work in painting, art history, and religion at Pomona College and received her MFA from the University of California, Irvine in 1971. Smith was a founding member of F-Space Gallery in Irvine, where her early performances emphasized ceremony and corporeality. Early pieces, including “Ritual Meal” (1969), “Feed Me” (1973), and “Celebration of the Holy Squash” (1971) have become iconic in the history of performance and are legendary examples of the artist’s demanding yet generous work. Her work explores the physicality of the mineralogical, vegetal, and corporal to speak to both the concrete materiality of our existence, and her existential amazement of our shared embodiment in the world. Smith’s work has been featured in multiple exhibitions, including in “iWACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution (2008–09),” “The Radicalization of a ’50s Housewife” at UCI, and “State of Mind” at OCMA and the Bronx Museum. Her retrospective “The 21st Century Odyssey Part II: The Performances of Barbara T. Smith” was held at Pomona College Museum of Art in Claremont and Kennedy Museum of Art, Ohio University.

Judy Chicago
Long recognized for her pioneering work in investigations and celebrations of the feminine, Chicago worked with environments from at least 1967, when she, Eric Orr, and Lloyd Hamrol created atmospheric conditions using dry ice at Century City in Los Angeles. Her colored smoke works, which she describes as “feminized atmospheres” have a long history in her practice, from works such as “Smoke Bodies” and “Immolation IV” (1972) to “A Purple Poem for Miami” (2019). This print features Chicago in a celebratory performance for her eightieth birthday.

Math Bass
Math Bass’s digital work uses paired-down signs reminiscent of of the work of Giovanni Pintori or Massimo and Lella Vignelli. In these prints, vaguely suggestive anatomical signs cavort with playful architectural referents—flat, arched entries, staircase risers, and domed turrets. Bass has gained increasing recognition for their ambiguous, coded visual syntax, which draws on corporal, architectural, and linguistic forms in open and playful narratives. Their work has been exhibited at Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Mary Boone Gallery, New York (2018); The Jewish Museum, New York (2017); Yuz Museum, Shanghai (2017); and MoMA PS1, New York (2015), and is included in the permanent collections of Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CA; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; and Yuz Museum, Shanghai, CN.

Cirrus Gallery and Cirrus Editions Ltd.

can be reached at:

213.680.3473

2011 S. Santa Fe Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90021